Tag Archives: awards

SF/F Translation Award Team Seek Nominees

Cheryl Morgan sent me the following, which I expect will be of interest to many:

We are looking for 2011 nominees for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Translation Awards. You can see what we have got already here: http://www.sfftawards.org/?page_id=7.

There is an enormous amount of SF&F published in languages other than English, and we get to see very little of it. Next month I’ll be getting to meet Ahmed Towfik, the Egyptian writer who has a book out in English this year. He has over 200 others untranslated, and that’s just the tip of the Arabic fiction iceberg.

As well as looking for nominees, we are also looking for volunteers to help run the awards. For various reasons Kevin and I are unable to spend nearly as much time on them as we have in the past. If you are interested in translated fiction, check out the sort of work we need done here: http://www.sfftawards.org/?p=460.

Very little translated work crosses my desk, but when it does, I’ll do my best to bring it to the award administrators’ attention. Unfortunately the only translated SF/F book I recall covering recently, John Ajvide Lindqvist’s Harbor, was published in the U.K. as Harbour in 2010, so it’s not eligible for this year’s award. I’ll certainly be keeping my eyes peeled from now on.

An Open Letter to Lambda Literary Foundation Co-Chair Dr. Judith Markowitz

Dear Dr. Markowitz:

I don’t believe we’ve been introduced. I’m the SF/fantasy/horror reviews editor at Publishers Weekly and a past judge of the SF/F/H Lambda Award.

I am equal parts delighted and dismayed by the press release currently being circulated regarding the changes to the Lambda Awards. Delighted, because I was appalled when the 2009 rule change required us to perform bedroom checks on nominees to determine their eligibility, and further distressed when a friend of mine, also a judge, was informed that a good rule of thumb was to check an author’s bio and see whether a different-sex partner was mentioned. This rule of thumb obviously excludes trans, genderqueer, and queer authors who are in different-sex partnerships (many of whom I was pleased to suggest as finalists and winners during my time as a Lammy judge). I withdrew from judging in great part because of these changes, and I’m very pleased to see that the majority of the awards will be open to all authors again.

I am dismayed, however, by this:

“LGBT authors will be recognized with three awards marking stages of a writer’s career: the Betty Berzon Debut Fiction Award (to one gay man and one lesbian), the Jim Duggins Outstanding Mid-Career Novelist Prize (to one male-identified and one female-identified author), and the Pioneer Award (to one male-identified and one female-identified individual or group)”

In other words, non-monosexual debut authors need not apply, and genderqueer and intersex authors as well as those involved in different-sex collaborations are not welcome at any stage of their careers. How can you even think of calling this a new policy of inclusiveness?

I cannot fathom the decision-making process that led to the splitting of these awards along gendered lines, especially since you must be aware of the growing number of queer people who do not identify as gay, lesbian, male, or female. Why not simply state that each award will go to two people a year? Why take such specific and exclusionary steps? Quota systems serve no one, and I say that as an ardent feminist and anti-racist who has long campaigned for more diverse winners and nominees across the spectrum of speculative fiction awards. Enforcing year-by-year equality between two communities while excluding all others only exposes the artificiality of such methods, which have so little to do with who the six most talented and recognition-worthy authors may be in any given year. You may intend these protectionist tactics to keep the awards “safe” from the encroachment of straight authors, but in the process, you’re joining a long and ignominious tradition of queer people who pay lip service to the B and the T while doing everything possible to promote the L and the G.

Saying that only gays and lesbians, and only men and women, are eligible for recognition is really no different from saying that only queer authors are eligible for the awards in general, except that you have made the criteria even more restrictive. You will still need to contend with the deep moral problems that arise from demanding that authors out themselves–in a world that can still be extremely dangerous for overtly queer and trans people, especially people of color, people who don’t conform to gender norms, and people living in repressive and overtly anti-queer cultures–and subscribe to a particular set of definitions. I had hoped for better from the Lammys. I’m very, very disappointed.

I strongly urge you to consider how many talented and worthy authors may be excluded from consideration for these three new awards, and then to update the eligibility criteria to reflect the true breadth and depth of the community you purport to represent and celebrate.

Sincerely,
Rose Fox

(cc: awards coordinator pro tem Richard Labonté, The Outer Alliance, my personal and professional blogs)

EDIT: Dr. Markowitz has responded to me, and given me permission to post her response:

The Debut Fiction awards, like any other funded awards, cannot be changed without the full support of the funders. Those discussion are in process but LLF needed to release the guidelines before September 1 so that authors and publishers could begin making nominations.

I am baffled as to why one would invite nominations for an award whose nomination guidelines might be in flux, but at least they’re talking about it.

EDIT 2: Jenn Reese points out that the named awards mentioned above were previously established. My objections stand, but my reference to them as “new awards” is erroneous.

The 2011 Hugo Award Winners

As announced at Worldcon, below are the winners of the 2011 Hugo Awards. Exactly 2100 valid ballots were received, all but 14 electronically.

John W. Campbell Best New Writer Award (not a Hugo):

  • Saladin Ahmed
  • Lauren Beukes
  • Larry Correia
  • Lev Grossman
  • Dan Wells

Best Fan Artist:

  • Brad W. Foster
  • Randall Monroe
  • Maurine Starkey
  • Steve Stiles
  • Taral Wayne

Best Fan Writer:

  • James Bacon
  • Claire Brialey
  • Christopher J. Garcia
  • James Nicoll
  • Steven H Silver

Best Fanzine:

  • Banana Wings
  • Challenger
  • The Drink Tank
  • File 770
  • Starship Sofa

Best Semiprozine:

  • Clarkesworld
  • Interzone
  • Lightspeed
  • Locus
  • Weird Tales

Best Professional Artist:

  • Daniel Dos Santos
  • Bob Eggleton
  • Stephan Martinière
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan

Best Editor, Long Form:

  • Lou Anders
  • Ginjer Buchanan
  • Moshe Feder
  • Liz Gorinsky
  • Nick Mamatas
  • Beth Meacham
  • Juliet Ulman

Best Editor, Short Form:

  • John Joseph Adams
  • Stanley Schmidt
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Gordon van Gelder
  • Sheila Williams

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form:

  • Doctor Who: “A Christmas Carol”
  • Doctor Who: “The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang”
  • Doctor Who: “Vincent and the Doctor”
  • “Fuck Me, Ray Bradbury”
  • “The Lost Thing”

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form:

  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part I
  • How to Train Your Dragon
  • Inception
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
  • Toy Story Three

Best Graphic Story:

  • Fables: Witches
  • Girl Genius, vol. 10
  • Grandville Mon Amour
  • Shlock Mercenary: Massively Parallel
  • The Unwritten, vol. 2

Best Related Work:

  • Bearings: Reviews, 1997-2001, Gary K. Wolfe
  • The Business of Science Fiction, Mike Resnick and Barry N. Malzberg
  • Chicks Dig Time Lords, Lynne M. Thomas and Tara O’Shea
  • Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century, vol. 1, William H. Patterson Jr.
  • Writing Excuses, season 4, Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, and Dan Wells

Best Short Story:

  • “Amaryllis” by Carrie Vaughn
  • “For Want of a Nail” by Mary Robinette Kowal
  • “Ponies” by Kij Johnson
  • “The Things” by Peter Watts

Best Novelette:

  • “Eight Miles,” Sean McMullen
  • “The Emperor of Mars,” Allen M. Steele
  • “The Jaguar House, in Shadow,” Aliette de Bodard
  • “Plus or Minus,” James Patrick Kelly
  • “That Leviathan, Which Thou Has Made” Eric James Stone

Best Novella:

  • “The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath the Queen’s Window,” Rachel Swirsky
  • The Lifecycle of Software Objects, Ted Chiang
  • “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon,” Elizabeth Hand
  • “The Sultan of the Clouds,” Geoffrey Landis
  • “Troika,” Alistair Reynolds

Best Novel:

  • Blackout/All Clear, Connie Willis
  • Cryoburn, Lois McMaster Bujold
  • The Dervish House, Ian McDonald
  • Feed, Mira Grant
  • The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, N.K. Jemisin

Congratulations to all the winners! Especially Sheila Williams, whose win is long overdue.

World Fantasy Award Finalists, and a Hugo Nudge

Very few surprises on this list, so my only comment is that I’m unreasonably happy to see a set of Best Novel finalists that doesn’t include Blackout/All Clear. (Yes, I know the reason it’s not there is that it’s not fantasy. It still makes me happy.)

Speaking of which, all you Worldcon attendees and supporters should take this as a reminder to get your Hugo votes in if you haven’t already; the deadline is this Sunday.

As reported by Locus, the finalists for the 2010 World Fantasy Awards:

Best Novel

  • Zoo City, Lauren Beukes (Jacana South Africa; Angry Robot)
  • The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit)
  • The Silent Land, Graham Joyce (Gollancz; Doubleday)
  • Under Heaven, Guy Gavriel Kay (Viking Canada; Roc; Harper Voyager UK)
  • Redemption in Indigo, Karen Lord (Small Beer)
  • Who Fears Death, Nnedi Okorafor (DAW)

Best Novella

  • Bone and Jewel Creatures, Elizabeth Bear (Subterranean)
  • The Broken Man, Michael Byers (PS)
  • “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon”, Elizabeth Hand (Stories: All-New Tales)
  • The Thief of Broken Toys, Tim Lebbon (ChiZine)
  • “The Mystery Knight”, George R.R. Martin (Warriors)
  • “The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers beneath the Queen’s Window”, Rachel Swirsky (Subterranean Summer 2010)

Best Short Fiction

  • “Beautiful Men” , Christopher Fowler (Visitants: Stories of Fallen Angels and Heavenly Hosts)
  • “Booth’s Ghost”, Karen Joy Fowler (What I Didn’t See and Other Stories)
  • “Ponies”, Kij Johnson (Tor.com 11/17/10)
  • “Fossil-Figures”, Joyce Carol Oates (Stories: All-New Tales)
  • “Tu Sufrimiento Shall Protect Us”, Mercurio D. Rivera (Black Static 8-9/10)

Best Anthology

  • The Way of the Wizard, John Joseph Adams, ed. (Prime)
  • My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me, Kate Bernheimer, ed. (Penguin)
  • Haunted Legends, Ellen Datlow & Nick Mamatas, eds. (Tor)
  • Stories: All-New Tales, Neil Gaiman & Al Sarrantonio, eds. (Morrow; Headline Review)
  • Black Wings: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror, S.T. Joshi, ed. (PS)
  • Swords & Dark Magic, Jonathan Strahan & Lou Anders, eds. (Eos)

Best Collection

  • What I Didn’t See and Other Stories, Karen Joy Fowler (Small Beer)
  • The Ammonite Violin & Others, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Subterranean)
  • Holiday, M. Rickert (Golden Gryphon)
  • Sourdough and Other Stories, Angela Slatter (Tartarus)
  • The Third Bear, Jeff VanderMeer (Tachyon)

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong
  • Kinuko Y. Craft
  • Richard A. Kirk
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan

Special Award, Professional

  • John Joseph Adams, for editing and anthologies
  • Lou Anders, for editing at Pyr
  • Marc Gascoigne, for Angry Robot
  • Stéphane Marsan & Alain Névant, for Bragelonne
  • Brett Alexander Savory & Sandra Kasturi, for ChiZine

Special Award, Non-Professional

  • Stephen Jones, Michael Marshall Smith, & Amanda Foubister, for Brighton Shock!: The Souvenir Book Of The World Horror Convention 2010
  • Alisa Krasnostein, for Twelfth Planet Press
  • Matthew Kressel, for Sybil’s Garage and Senses Five Press
  • Charles Tan, for Bibliophile Stalker
  • Lavie Tidhar, for The World SF Blog

Congratulations to all!

Back from Readercon

A scant few weeks after posting about my attempt to go as long as possible without meeting Neil Gaiman, I have lost the game: he randomly showed up at Readercon (yes, the convention committee was as surprised as everyone else) and Peter Straub kindly introduced us. We also got surprise visits from Junot Diaz and Marjorie M. Liu. One of my favorite things about Readercon is that you never know who’s going to come by.

Neil was at the convention primarily to attend the Shirley Jackson Awards ceremony, one of three that take place at Readercon. The winners:

  • Novel: Mr. Shivers by Robert Jackson Bennett
  • Novella: “Mysterium Tremendum” by Laird Barron
  • Novelette: “Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains” by Neil Gaiman
  • Short story: “The Things” by Peter Watts
  • Collection: Occultation by Laird Barron
  • Anthology: Stories: All New Tales edited by Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio

The full list of nominees is here, and you can see video of the ceremony here.

Also given at Readercon are the Rhysling Awards for speculative poetry. In the short poem category:

  • First place: “El Codex Chupacabra” by Juan Manuel Perez
  • Second place: “Welcome Home (The Nebulas Song)” by Janis Ian
  • Third place: “Peach-Creamed Honey” by Amal El-Mohtar

And in the long poem category:

  • First place: “The Sea King’s Second Bride” by C. S. E. Cooney
  • Second place: “Dark Rains Here and There” by Bruce Boston
  • Third place: “Wreck-Diving the Starship” by Robert Frazier

This year’s Cordwainer Smith Rediscovery Award went to Katherine MacLean, the award’s first female winner and first living winner. She was on hand to accept the award, give a short speech on the nature of sentience and intelligence, be interviewed by Samuel R. Delany (that link goes to a video of the interview, no transcript) and generally charm and delight everyone at the convention.

Also announced this weekend (but at Mythcon, not at Readercon) were the Mythopoeic Awards. The winners:

  • Adult literature: Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord
  • Children’s literature: The Queen’s Thief series by Megan Whalen Turner
  • Inklings studies: Planet Narnia by Michael Ward
  • Myth and fantasy studies: The Victorian Press and the Fairy Tale by Caroline Sumpter

Congratulations to the many winners! I love that all these awards touch on very different aspects of our genre; it’s wonderful to be reminded just how broad the SF/F/H umbrella is, and how many amazing people crowd together beneath it.

I am entirely hoarse, entirely behind on my work, entirely exhausted, and still glowing from the joys of this past weekend. Many thanks to the Genreville readers who came up to say hello; it’s nice to know I’m writing to real people and not just shouting into the void. I hope to meet more of you at Worldcon in just a few weeks!

2010 Locus Awards Announced

As reported by the always-amazing SF Awards Watch, the winners of the 2010 Locus Awards:

  • Science Fiction Novel: Blackout/All Clear, Connie Willis (Spectra)
  • Fantasy Novel: Kraken, China Miéville (Macmillan UK; Del Rey)
  • First Novel: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit UK; Orbit US)
  • YA Book: Ship Breaker, Paolo Bacigalupi (Little, Brown)
  • Novella: The Lifecycle of Software Objects, Ted Chiang (Subterranean)
  • Novelette: “The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains”, Neil Gaiman (Stories)
  • Short Story: “The Thing About Cassandra”, Neil Gaiman (Songs of Love and Death)
  • Magazine: Asimov’s
  • Publisher: Tor
  • Anthology: Warriors, George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois, eds. (Tor)
  • Collection: Fritz Leiber: Selected Stories, Fritz Leiber (Night Shade)
  • Editor: Ellen Datlow
  • Artist: Shaun Tan
  • Non-Fiction: Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1: 1907-1948: Learning Curve, William H. Patterson, Jr., (Tor)
  • Art Book: Spectrum 17, Cathy & Arnie Fenner, eds. (Underwood)

My reactions, in order:

  1. Yay Hundred Thousand Kingdoms!
  2. Yay Shaun Tan! Yay Ellen Datlow! Both kind of predictable, but hard to argue with.
  3. Wait, Blackout/All Clear won another award? Why? This means it’s going to win a Hugo too, doesn’t it. AUGH.
  4. And I adore China, but Kraken is not his best work and certainly was not the best fantasy novel published in 2010. And Lifecycle left me completely cold. And “The Truth” is all right but I’m not sure why everyone’s so keen on it.
  5. Has Orbit ever won a Best Publisher award? If not, I vow to live long enough to see it happen.

Stoker Award Winners

Via Nick Kaufmann, the 2010 Stoker Award Winners:

Superior Achievement in a Novel
A Dark Matter by Peter Straub

Superior Achievement in a First Novel (tie)
Black And Orange by Benjamin Kane Ethridge
Castle of Los Angeles by Lisa Morton

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction
Invisible Fences by Norman Prentiss

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction
“The Folding Man” by Joe R. Lansdale

Superior Achievement in an Anthology
Haunted Legends edited by Ellen Datlow and Nick Mamatas

Superior Achievement in a Collection
Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King

Superior Achievement in Nonfiction
To Each Their Darkness by Gary A. Braunbeck

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection
Dark Matters by Bruce Boston

Congratulations to all the winners!

A Case in Point

Jason Sanford on this year’s Million Writers Award contest:

In years past I’ve been the sole judge, reading all the notable stories and picking my ten favorites. This year, though, I invited two others to join me in this duty. Everything was looking good until one of these judges decided she no longer wanted to be a judge.

You see, she was worried what a writing friend would say because she hadn’t picked this friend’s story from the notable list. Even though this judge had already turned in her picks, and even though I promised her anonymity, at the last minute she demanded I remove her and not use her selections.

I gnash my teeth and flail my arms because this is so stupid. This is what happens when we let personal connections get in the way of honest evaluation. Clearly the judge was capable of setting her friendships aside when evaluating the stories, because she passed over the friend’s story rather than giving it special consideration. That’s step one. But step two is trusting her friend to take a similarly dispassionate, quality-based approach, and apparently that was unpossible. So the judge’s assessment of the friend’s irrationality is really what led the judge to withdraw.

The solution seems straightforward:

  1. If you are in the business of evaluating artistic works created by people you may know, only befriend the sensible, rational people in that group of artists.
  2. If you fear that a friend of yours is not sensible and will be offended by you not automatically declaring their work the best ever simply because you are friends, either stop being friends with them or cope with their irrationality, but don’t pass the buck. Your friends are your problem.
  3. If neither 1 nor 2 is tenable, get out of the business of judging or reviewing.

I realize this sounds a bit harsh, but as a former awards judge I am appalled by this judge’s behavior. Really poor form.

I do wish it were easier to do anonymous review in SF/F/H awards and contests, and even in book reviewing and anthology compiling. Obviously it’s impossible for a retrospective award–the judges are fans, and will already have read many of the works up for consideration–but under some other circumstances it might be worth trying. Another layer between judges/editors/critics and authors can only be a good thing.

2010 Nebula Award Winners Announced

As announced at the Nebula Awards Weekend, the 2010 winners:

Short Story (tie)

Novelette

Novella

Novel

The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation

  • Inception, Christopher Nolan (director), Christopher Nolan (screenplay) (Warner)
  • Despicable Me, Pierre Coffin & Chris Renaud (directors), Ken Daurio & Cinco Paul (screenplay), Sergio Pablos (story) (Illumination Entertainment)
  • Doctor Who: ‘‘Vincent and the Doctor’’, Richard Curtis (writer), Jonny Campbell (director)
  • How to Train Your Dragon, Dean DeBlois & Chris Sanders (directors), William Davies, Dean DeBlois, & Chris Sanders (screenplay) (DreamWorks Animation)
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Edgar Wright (director), Michael Bacall & Edgar Wright (screenplay) (Universal)
  • Toy Story 3, Lee Unkrich (director), Michael Arndt (screenplay), John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, & Lee Unkrich (story) (Pixar/Disney)

Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy

Congratulations to the winners and nominees!

To be honest, I don’t find this list at all exciting, especially in the context of the nominees. I feel like SFWA had a chance to really shake things up this year and recognize the up and coming generation of writers, and they missed that chance in favor of lauding the longtime stalwarts of the genre. Is this the last opportunity SFWA had to give awards to Harlan Ellison and Terry Pratchett? Maybe. But it was also their first opportunity to give awards to Amal El-Mohtar, Shweta Narayan, Nnedi Okorafor, and Barry Deutsch–a slate of winners that would have sent a very different message about the kinds of works, and the kinds of authors, that SFWA finds worthy of acclaim.

I sincerely hope this is not a predictor of the Hugos, especially the all-white* winners list and the award for Blackout/All Clear.

* To the best of my knowledge.

On the bright side, as Nicholas Whyte points out, three of the five fiction Nebula winners are female and Swirsky is the first Hugo or Nebula winner born in the 1980s. I feel suddenly old…

Hugo Award Finalists Announced

Transcribed live from the Eastercon broadcast, so please forgive (and let me know about) errors and omissions. I suspect there’s a list of people who get embargoed press releases. I am not on that list. I should find out how to get on that list.

A total of 1006 ballots were received–more than ever before. 684 from Renovation members, 322 from Aussiecon 4 members.

Campbell finalists:

  • Saladin Ahmed
  • Lauren Beukes
  • Larry Correia
  • Lev Grossman
  • Dan Wells

All in their second year of eligibility. I’m impressed that they pronounced Saladin’s name correctly.

Best fan artist:

  • Brad W. Foster
  • Randall Monroe
  • Maurine Starkey
  • Steve Stiles
  • Taral Wayne

Randall Monroe’s first Hugo nomination!

Best fan writer:

  • James Bacon
  • Claire Brialey
  • Christopher J. Garcia
  • James Nicoll
  • Steven H Silver

Lots of applause for all. Congrats to James Nicoll and Steven Silver, both PW reviewers!

Best fanzine:

  • Banana Wings
  • Challenger
  • The Drink Tank
  • File 770
  • Starship Sofa

Best semiprozine:

  • Clarkesworld
  • Interzone
  • Lightspeed
  • Locus
  • Weird Tales

Tepid applause for Locus, probably because no one wants it to win YET AGAIN.

Best professional artist:

  • Daniel Dos Santos
  • Bob Eggleton
  • Stephan Martinière
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan

No surprises there. Tan just won a BSFA Award for “The Lost Thing.”

Best editor, long form:

  • Lou Anders
  • Ginjer Buchanan
  • Moshe Feder
  • Liz Gorinsky
  • Nick Mamatas
  • Beth Meacham
  • Juliet Ulman

Seven due to a tie for fifth place. None have ever won before.

Best editor, short form:

  • John Joseph Adams
  • Stanley Schmidt
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Gordon van Gelder
  • Sheila Williams

John’s first nomination! Amazing.

Best dramatic presentation, short form:

  • Doctor Who: “A Christmas Carol”
  • Doctor Who: “The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang”
  • Doctor Who: “Vincent and the Doctor”
  • “Fuck Me, Ray Bradbury”
  • “The Lost Thing”

I greatly admire the dignity with which the Admiral announced the fourth item. “The Lost Thing,” of course, has already won an Oscar; will a Hugo be anticlimactic?

Best dramatic presentation, long form:

  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part I
  • How to Train Your Dragon
  • Inception
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
  • Toy Story Three

Best graphic story:

  • Fables: Witches
  • Girl Genius, vol. 10
  • Grandville Mon Amour
  • Shlock Mercenary: Massively Parallel
  • The Unwritten, vol. 2

Best related work:

  • Bearings: Reviews, 1997-2001, Gary K. Wolfe
  • The Business of Science Fiction, Mike Resnick and Barry N. Malzberg
  • Chicks Dig Time Lords, Lynne M. Thomas and Tara O’Shea
  • Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century, vol. 1, William H. Patterson Jr.
  • Writing Excuses, season 4, Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, and Dan Wells

First time a podcast has appeared in this category.

Best short story:

  • “Amaryllis” by Carrie Vaughn
  • “For Want of a Nail” by Mary Robinette Kowal
  • “Ponies” by Kij Johnson
  • “The Things” by Peter Watts

No fifth finalist due to the 5% cutoff rule.

Best novelette:

  • “Eight Miles,” Sean McMullen
  • “The Emperor of Mars,” Allen M. Steele
  • “The Jaguar House, in Shadow,” Aliette de Bodard
  • “Plus or Minus,” James Patrick Kelly
  • “That Leviathan, Which Thou Has Made” Eric James Stone

De Bodard just won a BSFA Award for a different short story.

Best novella:

  • “The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath the Queen’s Window,” Rachel Swirsky
  • The Lifecycle of Software Objects, Ted Chiang
  • “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon,” Elizabeth Hand
  • “The Sultan of the Clouds,” Geoffrey Landis
  • “Troika,” Alistair Reynolds

Best novel:

  • Blackout/All Clear, Connie Willis
  • Cryoburn, Lois McMaster Bujold
  • The Dervish House, Ian McDonald
  • Feed, Mira Grant
  • The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, N.K. Jemisin

The Dervish House just won a BSFA Award as well. This is a very weird slate; the first two are clearly outclassed by the latter three.

The ceremony closes with an interesting slide showing the gender breakdown of the nominees:

[chart]

Hope that’s legible; it’s a screencap of an online broadcast of a Powerpoint slide!

Congratulations to all the finalists!

Shirley Jackson Award Finalists Announced

I’m always very excited when the Shirley Jackson Award finalists are announced, because it means Readercon–where the award is given–is just three months away! And also, of course, because it gives me a reading list of top-notch dark fantasy and horror.

Novel:

  • Dark Matter, Michelle Paver (Orion)
  • A Dark Matter, Peter Straub (Doubleday)
  • Feed, Mira Grant (Orbit)
  • Mr. Shivers, Robert Jackson Bennett (Orbit)
  • The Reapers Are the Angels, Alden Bell (Holt)
  • The Silent Land, Graham Joyce (Gollancz)

Novella:

  • The Broken Man, Michael Byers (PS Publishing)
  • Chasing the Dragon, Nicholas Kaufmann (Chizine Publications)
  • “Mysterium Tremendum”, Laird Barron (Occultation, Night Shade)
  • One Bloody Thing After Another, Joey Comeau (ECW Press)
  • Subtle Bodies, Peter Dubé (Lethe Press)
  • The Thief of Broken Toys, Tim Lebbon (Chizine Publications)

Novelette:

  • “–30–,” Laird Barron (Occultation, Night Shade)
  • “The Broadsword,” Laird Barron, (Black Wings, PS Publishing)
  • “Holderhaven,” Richard Butner, (Crimewave 11: Ghosts)
  • “The Redfield Girls,” Laird Barron (Haunted Legends, Tor)
  • “Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains,” Neil Gaiman (Stories: All New Tales, William Morrow)

Short story:

  • “As Red as Red,” by Caitlin R. Kiernan (Haunted Legends, Tor)
  • “Booth’s Ghost,” Karen Joy Fowler (What I Didn’t See, Small Beer Press)
  • “The Foxes,” Lily Hoang (Haunted Legends, Tor)
  • “six six six,” Laird Barron (Occultation, Night Shade)
  • “The Things,” Peter Watts (Clarkesworld, Issue 40)

Single-author collection:

  • Occultation, Laird Barron (Night Shade)
  • The Ones That Got Away, Stephen Graham Jones (Prime Books)
  • The Third Bear, Jeff Vandermeer (Tachyon)
  • What I Didn’t See, Karen Joy Fowler (Small Beer Press)
  • What Will Come After, Scott Edelman (PS Publishing)

Edited anthology:

  • Black Wings: Tales of Lovecraftian Horror, edited by S. T. Joshi (PS Publications)
  • Haunted Legends, edited by Ellen Datlow and Nick Mamatas (Tor)
  • My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales, edited by Kate Bernheimer (Penguin)
  • Stories: All New Tales, edited by Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio (William Morrow)
  • Swords and Dark Magic: The New Sword and Sorcery, edited by Jonathan Strahan and Lou Anders (Harper Voyager)

There are two surprises on here for me: one is Straub’s A Special Place not appearing in the novella category, and the other is Joey Comeau’s book actually getting some well-deserved attention. The novel category is really the one to watch. I think Feed deserves the win, but it will be interesting to see how a young woman’s first horror novel fares against the latest masterwork by a man generally considered to be the best in his field. No offense to any of the other nominees, but I will be completely shocked if anything other than Feed or A Dark Matter gets the nod.

Also, it’s nice to see women represented in four of the six categories, though it would be even nicer if it were six out of six. Keep writing, ladies! Even when you get reviews like this.

2011 Science Fiction Hall of Fame Inductees

Locus reports:

The 2011 inductees to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame are Harlan Ellison, Vincent Di Fate, Moebius (Jean Giraud), and Gardner Dozois. The induction ceremony will be held Saturday June 25, 2011 at the Experience Music Project/Science Fiction Museum in Seattle WA.

I’m especially delighted that Harlan Ellison and Gardner Dozois are being honored by the HoF; both certainly deserve it, I’m personally very fond of both of them, and Gardner is one of this year’s Readercon guests of honor, so we now look very clever for having selected him!

2010 Tiptree Award Winner Announced

According to the Tiptree website, the 2010 Tiptree Award goes to Baba Yaga Laid an Egg, by Dubravka Ugresic (Canongate, 2010).

Baba Yaga Laid an Egg impressed with its power and its grace. Tiptree juror Jessa Crispin explains that the beginning of the book “does not scream science fiction or fantasy. It starts quietly, with a meditation on the author’s aging mother, and the invisibility of the older woman…. But things shift wholly in the second act, with a surreal little tale of three old ladies, newly moneyed, who check into an Eastern European health spa. There’s another revolution in the third act, where what looks like a scholarly examination of the Russian fairy tale hag erupts into a rallying cry for mistreated and invisible women everywhere.”

Crispin notes that the fairy tale figure Baba Yaga is the witch, the hag, the inappropriate wild woman, the marginalized and the despised. She represents inappropriateness, wilderness, and confusion. “She’s appropriate material for Ugresic, who was forced into exile from Croatia for her political beliefs. The jurors feel Baba Yaga Laid an Egg is a splendid representation of this type of woman, so cut out of today’s culture.”

Honor list:

  • The Bone Palace by Amanda Downum (Orbit 2010)
  • The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit 2010)
  • “Diana Comet and the Disappearing Lover” by Sandra McDonald (published as “Diana Comet,” Strange Horizons, March 2 & March 9, 2009)
  • “Drag Queen Astronaut” by Sandra McDonald (Crossed Genres issue 24, November 2010)
  • The Secret Feminist Cabal by Helen Merrick (Aqueduct Press 2009)
  • Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (DAW 2010)
  • Living with Ghosts by Kari Sperring (DAW 2009)
  • The Colony by Jillian Weise (Soft Skull Press 2010)

Long list:

  • Beth Bernobich, Passion Play (Tor 2010)
  • Stevie Carroll, “The Monitors” (Echoes of Possibilities, edited by Aleksandr Volnov, Noble Romance Publishing 2010)
  • Roxane Gay, “Things I Know About Fairy Tales” (Necessary Fiction, May 13, 2009)
  • Frances Hardinge, Gullstruck Island (MacMillan 2009)
  • Julia Holmes, Meeks (Small Beer Press 2010)
  • Malinda Lo, Ash (Little, Brown 2009)
  • Alissa Nutting, Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls (Starcherone Books 2010)
  • Helen Oyeyemi, White Is for Witching (Doubleday 2009)
  • Rachel Swirsky, “Eros, Philia, Agape” (Tor.com, March 3, 2009)

Congratulations to all!

Spectrum Awards Winners Announced

Irene Gallo has posted the winners of the 18th annual Spectrum Awards for excellence in SF/F art:

Concept Art
Gold: Kekai Kotaki for Riven Earth
Silver: Tomaz Jedruszek for Legends of Norrath

Dimensional
Gold: David Meng
Silver: Akihito

Comics
Gold: Rebecca Guay for A Flight of Angels
Silver: David Palumbo for Sleep
Silver: Joao Ruass for Fables 96

Books
Gold David Palumbo for God’s War
Silver: Dan Dos Santos for White Trash Zombie

Advertising
Gold: Ryohei Hase for Narco Americano
Silver: Sam Weber for The Fisherman’s Wife

Editorial
Gold: Andrew Jones for Share One Planet
Silver: Brom for Redd Wing

Institutional
Gold: Richard Anderson for Knight March
Silver: Donato Giancola for Mind Machine

Unpublished
Gold: Rebecca Guay for Pandora
Silver: J. S. Rossbach for White Heat
Silver: Scott Brundage for Tigers Have Striped Skin

Congratulations to all the winners!

The categories are so different from the award categories for written SF/F. I love the idea of a Hugo-associated award for Best Unpublished Novel, like the RWA Golden Heart Awards. I don’t know whether an ad spot has ever been nominated for Best Related Work, but there’s certainly plenty of fantasy in advertising, so why not? Maybe we could learn something from these artsy types.

Where Are the Hugo-Eligible Editors?

The Hugo nomination deadline is three weeks away. This is my first time voting (I don’t usually go to Worldcon) and I’m struggling with the Best Editor, Long Form category. Most editors aren’t credited in the books they edit, so unless they make a big self-promotional push, which I think many are reluctant to do, they’re invisible even to those of us who work in the industry.

Publishers Marketplace has some information about editors, but it’s behind a paywall, and I don’t know how complete it is. The SFeditors Wiki is a great concept, but it has obvious gaps and most of the pages haven’t been updated since 2006. You could try looking through blog posts and acknowledgments to see whether authors drop names, but it doesn’t seem to happen often, even in big announcements. Which editor convinced Carrie Vaughn that Tor was the place to publish her superb standalone novels? Who knows? Vaughn’s much-linked post about breaking up with Grand Central doesn’t say. (She also doesn’t name her ex-editor at Grand Central, despite describing her as “someone who I really like and who really knows her stuff.” Is there some code of silence in place that says you don’t name your editors even when complimenting them?)

So editors, please take a moment right now to update your SFeditors Wiki pages with information on the titles you edited in 2010. Authors and publicists, you can update those pages too, and you should if you love your editors and think they’re too shy to toot their own horns. Consider blogging about your editors if you want to give them an extra boost. It’s a favor to the voters, too; I think we’d all rather make our nominations based on real information than go by guesswork.

@MayorEmanuel, Hugo Nominee?

Bill Shunn is spearheading a campaign to get @MayorEmanuel–yes, a Twitter account–nominated for next year’s Hugo in the “Best Related Work” category. This would of course be particularly well-suited to the 2012 Worldcon location of Chicago.

If you’re not familiar with the @MayorEmanuel account, a succinct summary is that it was the Twitter feed from an alternate-universe Rahm Emanuel. The feed was a non-stop stream of obscenity, Chicago in-jokes, politics, and pure far-out wackiness. His companions included a pet duck (named Quaxelrod after Emanuel staffer David Axelrod) and his adventures involved sleeping in igloos, crowd-surfing up to the stage to give his mayoral acceptance speech, and being taken to the secret celery farm on top of City Hall. After the election, he was sucked into a time vortex to avoid disturbing causality. The SFnality of this narrative can hardly be doubted, and there’s no question that it was brilliantly written (by the reluctantly nonymous Dan Sinker, as revealed in The Atlantic). Tim Carmody has posted selected excerpts at “The Two Mayors” and “The Last Hours of @MayorEmanuel”, and the entire thing (about 35,000 words, which would perhaps also make it eligible in the novella category) is archived at elsewhere.org in chronological order for easy reading, but there was really no substitute for watching it live, especially as a genuine hailstorm began over Chicago just as the time vortex was opening up and an enormous clap of thunder heralded @MayorEmanuel’s departure from this world.

Given the ephemerality of Twitter and the dependence of the story on real-world context, does @MayorEmanuel really have a shot at the Hugos? How many of the feed’s 41,000+ followers–many of whom wept as they realized the story was coming to an end–will register for that Chicago Worldcon and become Hugo voters? I suppose it really only takes a few hundred to get it on the ballot; Best Related Work isn’t a hotly contested category most years.

Regardless of whether it’s a viable candidate, I find it really thrilling that unusual works are being considered for these awards. Look at Hereville, which started out as a webcomic, on the Norton ballot; and The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making, an e-book, winning the Norton the year before. That’s just awesome.

Martin Lewis on the Clarke Awards, with Charts

Over at Everything Is Nice, UK critic Martin Lewis is doing a really nice series of posts on the list of this year’s Clarke-eligible books, with lots and lots of charts and statistics. He starts with the obvious stuff:

And then moves on to the decidedly non-obvious stuff:

The whole series is worth reading for what it says about the books, the authors, the publishers, and the general state of SF in the UK. Hat tip to James Nicoll for the pointer.

Incidentally, all those graphics are created with Google Charts. Here’s what the second “image” URL looks like:

http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?cht=p&chs=550x375&chd=t:16,34,4&chxt=x&chxl=0:|30%|63%|7%&chdl=First%20Person|Third%20Person|Both&chtt=Tense

Very nifty! I’ll have to remember this the next time I have data that calls for visual display. Too bad about the orange color, though.

Link Roundup

  • The Stoker Award shortlist is out! Congratulations to all the finalists.
  • The Clarke Award eligibility list is out! And Torque Control is holding a contest for guessing the six finalists, with the winner getting copies of all six books and the Clarke homage anthology Fables from the Fountain.
  • The winner of today’s “We’re living in the future” award: putting giant kites on cargo ships to reduce fuel usage. That scratching sound at the edge of your hearing is Paolo Bacigalupi frantically taking notes.Next thing you know they’ll be calling sailing ships “carbon-neutral”… oh hey, they are.
  • Finally, author Adam P. Knave declares this the week of Ten a Day. Specifically, he suggests sending compliments to ten people a day, every day this week. There’s a blog badge for it and everything!So go spread the love. It’s a nice way to mark the end of February (I do not know anyone who likes February) and warm up either the slow crawl toward spring or the slow descent of fall, depending on your hemisphere.

Congratulations to Oscar Winner Shaun Tan!

It’s not every day that a past Worldcon Guest of Honor receives an Academy Award! In fact, I’m not sure that’s ever happened before. Congratulations to Shaun Tan, whose wonderful short film The Lost Thing (based on his picture book by the same title), which was apparently a dozen years in the making, won a well-deserved Oscar last night. I highly recommend taking 15 minutes to watch the film; you’ll quickly see why Tan is regarded as a top-notch artist of the fantastic and surreal, as well as a poignant storyteller.